Choosing the right access solution for your premises

folder_openCorporate, Industrial, Residential & Commercial

As we have established in previous blog entries, access is one of the most important things to consider when establishing a perimeter fence around your site or premises. Even the most secure perimeters require entry and exit points for authorised personnel. However, different sites have radically different access requirements. Fortunately, there are a wide variety of different access gates available.

Choosing the right security gates for your site is essential. Luckily, though, this doesn’t have to be a stressful or complicated process. You need to make just three major decisions to figure out which access gates are right for you. We’ll run through them in today’s blog entry.

1. Manual versus electronic

Manual, lock-and-key access gates and electronically-controlled gates serve slightly different functions. Manual gates provide easy access for any employees and personnel with the correct keys. Because they provide access in such a straightforward manner, they are useful on sites where speed and ease of access are crucial. In contrast, electronic gates often utilise codes, ID cards or other verification methods. This means they are usually more secure than manual gates, but they don’t provide access as quickly. As a result, they are useful on sites where a high level of security is essential.

2. Pedestrian versus vehicle access

Pedestrian access gates tend to be narrower and easier to secure than vehicle gates. Therefore, it’s often advisable to opt for these when security is a priority. However, vehicular gates are necessary on some sites. For example, if heavy goods are regularly transported to or from your site or premises, you will need to access the vehicles that carry them.

3. Manned versus unmanned

Some access solutions include booths so that they can be manned and controlled by security personnel. Operated gates are ideal for high-security sites. However, they are not always practical. If your employees need to access your site at times when your security personnel aren’t available, you’ll need to provide unmanned gates that can be accessed by individual employees.

Here at Zaun, we design, manufacture and install a wide variety of access gates alongside our perimeter fencing solutions and other security measures. Once you have decided what type of gates you need, check out our range to find the best match.

About Zaun

Zaun Limited is the sole remaining manufacturer of welded and woven mesh fencing systems that manufactures the entire system in the UK.  Zaun makes the mesh, fencing panels, posts, clamp bars and fixings at its state-of-the-art five-acre production facility in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands.  Products have been tested and approved by testing organisations including CPNI, LPCB and Secured by Design.

Zaun works very closely with all stakeholders within the business including employees, local, national and international suppliers and a long-established customer base of fencing contractors to design, manufacture and supply high-quality fencing systems, increasingly often providing expertise in integrating PIDs and other systems into holistic security solutions.

Zaun was founded in 1996 and remains a private company solely owned by co-founder Alastair Henman with a regional office in Dubai. They are certified to the ISO 9001 quality standard. It is also a member of the Perimeter Security Suppliers’ Association (PSSA), of which Alastair Henman is a director.

Zaun is a proud British manufacturer and founder member of the Made in Britain campaign, a key player in the UK fencing market and one of the fastest-growing companies in an increasingly competitive industry.

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