Turkey heightens security on the Syrian border fences

folder_openBorder Security, High Security

Turkey has announced plans for one of the world’s biggest perimeter border fences along the 560-mile border with Syria after a suicide bomb left 32 dead in the border town of Suruc.

The Turkish government is determined to combat terrorism and has decided on the radical physical barrier. Although the execution will take a good deal of work, it will be relatively simple in its design. A 150-mile concrete wall topped with razor wire will be the centrepiece, together with a strengthened fence and a dedicated patrol road that deals with the other 400 miles of the border. Security fencing is more than good enough for one of the toughest borders in the world, then.

Drones, mobile surveillance vehicles and a central command and control centre will also contribute to the security effort. With fighters heading to Syria travelling freely through Turkey for several years, the government knows it fights with its hands to stem the tide of refugees joining the ranks of ISIS.

The bombing in Suruc seemed to target the Kurdish community, which has inflamed local racial tensions and brought accusations that the government actually backs attacks against the Kurds. The Turkish government has fiercely denied these rumours and has acted fast to develop a radical plan to protect the border and be seen actively fighting the growing threat of terrorism.

Of course, Turkey’s proximity to the volatile Syrian border means that a wall is the most obvious and effective means of controlling traffic in and out of the country. Of course, it is no guarantee, but the physical barriers and border fences will give the government a chance of protecting the vulnerable towns along the border and give its citizens peace of mind.

The US has pledged its support and will help construct the modular wall, 150km long. In addition, wire fencing will be reinforced along the rest of the border, supported with a 200-mile ditch and an increased military presence. Around half of Turkey’s border patrol is focused on Syria. Considering Turkey also shares borders with Iraq, Iran, Armenia, Georgia, Greece and Bulgaria, this is a remarkable resource share.

With increasingly advanced surveillance, it speaks volumes that a government would commit this much time, money and resource to build a traditional wall. There is no substitute for a physical barrier to keeping unwelcome people out, is the clear message.

Looking for High-Security Border Fencing? Look no further than Zaun.

About Zaun

Zaun Limited is the sole remaining manufacturer of welded and woven mesh fencing systems that manufactures the entire system in the UK.  Zaun makes the mesh, fencing panels, posts, clamp bars and fixings at its state-of-the-art five-acre production facility in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands.  Products have been tested and approved by testing organisations including CPNI, LPCB and Secured by Design.

Zaun works very closely with all stakeholders within the business including employees, local, national and international suppliers and a long-established customer base of fencing contractors to design, manufacture and supply high-quality fencing systems, increasingly often providing expertise in integrating PIDs and other systems into holistic security solutions.

Zaun was founded in 1996 and remains a private company solely owned by co-founder Alastair Henman with a regional office in Dubai. They are certified to the ISO 9001 quality standard. It is also a member of the Perimeter Security Suppliers’ Association (PSSA), of which Alastair Henman is a director.

Zaun is a proud British manufacturer and founder member of the Made in Britain campaign, a key player in the UK fencing market and one of the fastest-growing companies in an increasingly competitive industry.

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