Limiting access – keeping schools safe

folder_openSchools & Education

Schools play an essential part in our lives. In one sense, they are where we spend our early years learning how to read and write and socialise with other people. But, in another sense, they are where we entrust the safety of our children. Schools are generally very safe places for children, but ongoing vigilance and risk management procedures are necessary to ensure this.

It is important to limit access to any school site to protect children and staff on a day-to-day basis. Here are just some of the reasons why:

1. Theft

Today, schools are filled with modern IT equipment such as computers and televisions. In addition, offices will often contain personal items belonging to staff, such as phones, cash, laptops, etc., which are very appealing to a thief.

2. Restrict unauthorised access

Whether it is strangers, trespassers or parents who are restricted access to their children for legal reasons, security fencing and tightened access measures can help keep unauthorised persons out of the school grounds.

3. Unwanted attention

Although this might not be an issue in most schools, some press or paparazzi might seek access to school grounds following a high-publicity news story or if children of celebrities attend the school to get school-run photographs.

4. Protect children from themselves

Upset and angry children have a habit of wanting to hide from problems. Therefore, if those problems manifest themselves at school, it is natural that they should want to run away from the school. However, again modern practices and risk management make this relatively rare, and those that do run away are usually found very quickly.

Steps to take

  1. Ensure that there is one entrance and exit into and out of the school through a reception area operated by more than one staff member. This guarantees control over who goes in and out of the site and ensures that visitors are vetted and signed in. Emergency exits must be alarmed and checked throughout the day.
  2. Ensure that there is adequate security fencing around the school site. The height of the school fencing should ideally be no less than nine feet and designed or treated so that it cannot be scaled from either side.
  3. Provide adequate CCTV provision, especially around all the entrances, exits, ground floor windows and main gates.

To discuss perimeter fencing in your school, childcare or learning centre, contact Zaun today.

About Zaun

Zaun Limited is the sole remaining manufacturer of welded and woven mesh fencing systems that manufactures the entire system in the UK.  Zaun makes the mesh, fencing panels, posts, clamp bars and fixings at its state-of-the-art five-acre production facility in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands.  Products have been tested and approved by testing organisations including CPNI, LPCB and Secured by Design.

Zaun works very closely with all stakeholders within the business including employees, local, national and international suppliers and a long-established customer base of fencing contractors to design, manufacture and supply high-quality fencing systems, increasingly often providing expertise in integrating PIDs and other systems into holistic security solutions.

Zaun was founded in 1996 and remains a private company solely owned by co-founder Alastair Henman with a regional office in Dubai. They are certified to the ISO 9001 quality standard. It is also a member of the Perimeter Security Suppliers’ Association (PSSA), of which Alastair Henman is a director.

Zaun is a proud British manufacturer and founder member of the Made in Britain campaign, a key player in the UK fencing market and one of the fastest-growing companies in an increasingly competitive industry.

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