Do you need new welded mesh storage cages?

Welded mesh cages are the perfect place to keep valuable or dangerous items on-site. They’re sturdy enough to resist attempts at unauthorised access but simple enough to be opened quickly by you or your employees. If you don’t want to lock high-value equipment or dangerous items in a separate storage facility when they aren’t being used, welded mesh storage cages are the ideal solution. They are commonly used to store waste (including hazardous waste) before it is disposed of safely, substances that might be required for industrial processes and compact machinery. If you work in an industry that either uses or produces any of these things, you probably own at least one welded mesh cage already. But do you need new ones?

If you’ve had your current storage cages for several years, it might be time to invest in new ones. There are several things you can do to help you decide if you really do need new cages.

1. Test the resilience of your cage’s door

After years of use, wear-and-tear can weaken a mesh cage’s door. Carefully apply pressure to the doors of your mesh cages to see if they can be forced open or damaged. If you feel the door weakening or loosening, or if you notice the lock appears to be under strain, you should consider investing in new mesh cages. Remember, if criminals try to access your mesh cages, they won’t stop trying to force the door open when it weakens: they’ll continue until it’s broken and they have access to your equipment.

2. Look for signs of rust

In previous blogs, we’ve advised perimeter fence-owners to check their security fencing for signs of rust. Mesh cages are also susceptible to rust, which can weaken them structurally and make it easier for prospective thieves to break into them. If your cages have an excessive amount of rust on them, you probably need new ones.

3. Consider the size of your welded mesh cages

If you bought your cages while your business was still growing, you might have chosen smaller options. However, now that your business is bigger and uses more resources, these cages might not comfortably accommodate the items or materials that you have to store in them. If you’re having difficulty fitting everything in your current mesh cages, why not invest in larger models today?

Here at Zaun, we offer an excellent range of mesh storage cages alongside a wide range of other security solutions. So if you decide to replace your current storage cages, get in touch with us.

About Zaun

Zaun Limited is the sole remaining manufacturer of welded and woven mesh fencing systems that manufactures the entire system in the UK.  Zaun makes the mesh, fencing panels, posts, clamp bars and fixings at its state-of-the-art five-acre production facility in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands.  Products have been tested and approved by testing organisations including CPNI, LPCB and Secured by Design.

Zaun works very closely with all stakeholders within the business including employees, local, national and international suppliers and a long-established customer base of fencing contractors to design, manufacture and supply high-quality fencing systems, increasingly often providing expertise in integrating PIDs and other systems into holistic security solutions.

Zaun was founded in 1996 and remains a private company solely owned by co-founder Alastair Henman with a regional office in Dubai.  It manufactures to ISO 9001 standards. It is also a member of the Perimeter Security Suppliers’ Association (PSSA), of which Alastair Henman is a director.

Zaun is a proud British manufacturer and founder member of the Made in Britain campaign, a key player in the UK fencing market and one of the fastest-growing companies in an increasingly competitive industry.

Latest Blogs

Fencing for Farms

How can Duo8 perimeter fencing help with farm security?

electric perimeter fencing electric fence topping

Points to consider when selecting perimeter fencing

School Security Fencing

4 security solutions every school should consider

Data Centre High Security Fencing

What are the key dangers to data centre security?

Menu