What you need to consider when choosing school fencing

folder_openSchools & Education

Fencing is an essential security feature of any school and creates a safe learning and working environment for students and staff alike. However, good security fencing also provides clear surveillance of those entering and leaving the grounds and is often the first thing people will notice when looking at a school for future enrolment. Here are four things you need to consider when choosing school fencing.

1. Risk assessments

Security comes before everything else, so you will need to carry out a comprehensive risk assessment while considering performance, aesthetics, and maintenance issues. You can do this by thinking like a potential intruder and using photographs, drawings, and notes to identify different weaknesses. Also, don’t forget that having a high fence at the front of the school doesn’t necessarily guarantee security if there’s a low fence at the back. Ensure your perimeter security is consistent to make it as difficult as possible for intruders to break in.

2. Quality guaranteed

Budget constraints are common at all institutions, and it’s only natural to consider installing a cheap fence to cut costs. However, an inexpensive fence is likely to be low quality and might incur more costs in the long run. For example, it may need regular repair work and maintenance, and eventually, replacement.

3. Aesthetic value

While security should always be your main concern, you also need to consider the aesthetic value of your chosen fence. Ask yourself whether students, parents, and staff will take pride in how the school looks. Appearance might not seem important right now, but it will matter for students and staff who have to look at it every day. In addition, acoustic fencing will significantly reduce noise from the school environment or nearby roads, depending on the school’s location.

4. Standards and approval

Although school fences are there primarily to protect students and staff from intruders, their safety while they’re on the school grounds is important too. Ensure the fencing you choose is approved and prevents clothing from being ripped, has no sharp edges, and so on. While a height of 1.2 – 1.6m is best for demarcation purposes, the perimeter fence should ideally be 1.8 – 2.4m high for a school, depending on local authority regulations.

To find out more about the different types of fencing available for schools, contact us at Zaun today.

About Zaun

Zaun Limited is the sole remaining manufacturer of welded and woven mesh fencing systems that manufactures the entire system in the UK.  Zaun makes the mesh, fencing panels, posts, clamp bars and fixings at its state-of-the-art five-acre production facility in Wolverhampton in the West Midlands.  Products have been tested and approved by testing organisations including CPNI, LPCB and Secured by Design.

Zaun works very closely with all stakeholders within the business including employees, local, national and international suppliers and a long-established customer base of fencing contractors to design, manufacture and supply high-quality fencing systems, increasingly often providing expertise in integrating PIDs and other systems into holistic security solutions.

Zaun was founded in 1996 and remains a private company solely owned by co-founder Alastair Henman with a regional office in Dubai. They are certified to the ISO 9001 quality standard. It is also a member of the Perimeter Security Suppliers’ Association (PSSA), of which Alastair Henman is a director.

Zaun is a proud British manufacturer and founder member of the Made in Britain campaign, a key player in the UK fencing market and one of the fastest-growing companies in an increasingly competitive industry.

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